Naples Pathways Coalition

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  • 5 Jul 2019 1:44 PM | Michelle Avola (Administrator)

    Naples Pathways Coalition is thrilled to announce the Paradise Coast Trail! We envision this to be a premier, 70+ mile trail built exclusively for safe and enjoyable walking, running and biking. Connecting Naples, Ave Maria, Immokalee and many other areas within and beyond Collier County, it will expand transportation options, improve health and wellness, reduce our carbon footprint and provide a destination to experience the Paradise Coast's unique beauty.

    As many of you know, Florida leads the nation in the number of pedestrian and cyclist fatalities. Too many of us have either been hit by a vehicle while biking or running, or had numerous close calls. Without a safe network of non-motorized multi-use pathways, it is getting less and less safe for us. Across the country and across the state, places like Dunedin, Winter Garden and Inverness enjoy extensive, connected multi-use pathways, and shockingly, Naples does not. The Gordon River Greenway and the Rich King Memorial Greenway are heavily used and very popular with residents and visitors to the area, but they are 4-miles in length or less and are not connected to other safe pathways.

       

    The Paradise Coast Trail will provide several benefits: improved quality of life and healthier lifestyle, economic benefits to the county, increases to property values, greater safety for recreational and commuter bicyclists, just to name a few!

    We have partnered with Rails to Trails Conservancy and hired consulting firm Kimley-Horn to help us bring this vision to reality. This past Friday, the Collier Metropolitan Planning Organization voted in support of a resolution endorsing the project. The next big step is the feasibility study, and fundraising has already begun!

    We are hoping to fast track the trail's development and not wait on the typical improvement project time frame. If we can raise the funds needed for the feasibility study, we will be in a position to shave five years or more from the process! We invite you to donate today so we can all enjoy walking, running and biking on the Paradise Coast Trail as soon as possible.


  • 5 Jul 2019 1:30 PM | Michelle Avola (Administrator)

    Check out the WINK News story on the Paradise Coast Trail here.

    Check out the NBC-2 News story here.

    Check out the Naples Daily News story here.


  • 13 May 2019 10:47 AM | Michelle Avola (Administrator)

    Naples Pathways Coalition will be participating in the National Ride of Silence to honor cyclists who have been injured or killed while cycling, to raise awareness of the importance of bicycle safety, and to ask that everyone share the road.

    Everyone will meet at Cambier Park (755 8th Avenue S) at 6:00 p.m. on Wednesday, May 15th. Helmets are required, and we will take a slow, hour-long ride in silence downtown as we remember friends, family and members of the community whose lives were lost or whose lives changed as a result of a crash while riding a bike.

    The community is encouraged to join us in this meaningful ride. Many participants will be wearing their neon yellow NPC shirts for visibility and unity. Shirts will be available for a donation before and after the ride.   

    There is no fee to participate in the Ride of Silence, but donations will be accepted to help advocate for the families of individuals killed while biking or those still struggling after a serious crash. 

    Please contact Michelle@NaplesPathways.org for more information.


  • 24 Apr 2019 5:26 PM | Michelle Avola (Administrator)

    Cycling is a fun, healthy, and environmentally-friendly way to get where you need to go. As a cyclist, you know that you should stay aware of the traffic laws where you are riding, and always stay alert. The most important tip for your safety is to make sure you are visible. Visibility is key to avoiding a collision. You should do everything you can to stay visible and stand out in traffic. Here are a few tips for increasing your visibility while riding your bicycle:

    • ·         Wear fluorescent colors. Choose a neon yellow, bright orange, lime green, or hot pink shirt, jersey, jacket, or vest. Wear brightly colored clothing and gear, so you will stand out and won’t blend in with the landscape. If you choose white, brown, blue, green, or black, you are much more likely to blend in and not be noticed.
    • ·         Be sure your bike has a functioning headlight and taillight, and both are visible for several hundred feet. Use your front and rear lights in blinking mode during the day to increase visibility, and only your taillight should be blinking at night with the headlight a constant beam. Make sure your bike has plenty of reflectors too - on the fenders, spokes, pedals, and body.
    • ·         Ride in a prominent spot in the lane. Don’t ride next to the curb. That sets you up for a sideswipe by a car that gets too close. When you ride closer to the center of the lane, cars will need to change lanes to pass as they would any other vehicle, and that is additional protection for you.
    • ·         Adhere to traffic laws. Bicycles on the road are considered vehicles and must stop at stop signs and red lights. Be sure drivers at intersections by making eye contact with them, especially if you plan to ride across the intersection in front of them. Without eye contact, assume they do not see you.
    • ·         When you are changing lanes, merging, or turning, always signal your intentions. Use your left hand to point when going left and use your right hand to point when you are going right. Ride predictably so drivers will understand where you want to go. When you cut in and out of traffic, move lanes quickly, or ride between cars, you are setting yourself up for a crash.
    • ·         Don’t get too close to parked cars. When passing by parked cars, listen for locks opening, watch for doors opening, and watch for traffic. You could get “doored” by someone entering or exiting a vehicle who doesn’t see you.
    • ·         Don’t stop on the right side of vehicles because you will be in the blind spot. Even if you are riding in a bike lane, don’t pull up in that lane to the right of a car at an intersection. Always stop behind the vehicle. Otherwise, you could be run over by a vehicle that turns as they may not see you.
    • ·         Always assume that drivers don’t see you. To make sure you are as safe as possible, always ride with the assumption that drivers don’t notice you. Stay alert and be prepared to ride defensively.
    • ·         One last important reminder: never ride with earbuds or headphones. It is illegal, but it is also very unsafe. The only one looking out for you is you. You need all of your senses to do that effectively.

    Special thanks to Eric Minghella for this article.


  • 5 Apr 2019 1:19 PM | Michelle Avola (Administrator)

    Our office has gotten word that the Board of County Commissioners (BCC) will hear the Whippoorwill Lane and Marbella Lakes Drive Interconnection Study as Item 11D, on Tuesday, April 9, 2019.  The item will be heard no sooner than 1:00 p.m.  Please note - this is not a time certain for 1:00 p.m. as it could be heard at any time after 1:00 p.m.  If you are planning on attending, you might want to plan to be there starting at 1:00 PM. Support for this project is needed, as well as input on the design so that pedestrians and cyclists are equally considered with motorists. (We need bike lanes, a shared use path on one side and a sidewalk on the other.)

    The location of the meeting is as follows:

    Board of Collier County Commissioners

    3299 Tamiami Trail East

    BCC Chambers, 3rd floor

    Naples, FL 34112

    If you can't attend, please email the Board and tell them we need bike lanes, a shared use path on one side and a sidewalk on the other.

    Donna.Fiala@colliercountyfl.gov;

    Andy.Solis@colliercountyfl.gov;

    Burt.Saunders@colliercountyfl.gov;

    Penny.Taylor@colliercountyfl.gov;

    Bill.McDaniel@colliercountyfl.gov


  • 2 Apr 2019 11:43 AM | Michelle Avola (Administrator)


    Public Information Meeting to Discuss Land Development Code Amendments

    Thursday, April 4, 2019 5:30 p.m.  at the Golden Gate Community Center, 4701 Golden Gate Parkway, Naples, Florida 34116.

    Collier County proposes to amend the Collier County Land Development Code (LDC) to establish a Golden Gate Parkway Overlay District (GGPOD), which includes a Downtown Subdistrict and an Activity Center Subdistrict. The purpose and intent of the GGPOD is to support and implement residential and commercial redevelopment and renewal initiatives. The GGPOD and its two subdistricts will supersede the current Golden Gate Parkway Professional Office Commercial Overlay (GGPPOCO) and Golden Gate Downtown Center Commercial Overlay District (GGDCCO). This meeting will include an overview of the uses and standards proposed to apply to properties within the areas depicted below. This is an opportunity for public input.


    About the public meeting:

    Two or more members of the Board of County Commissioners may be present and may participate at the meeting. The subject matter of this meeting may be an item for discussion and action at a future Board of County Commissioners meeting.

    All interested parties are invited to attend, and to register to speak. All registered public speakers will be limited to three minutes unless permission for additional time is granted by the chairman.

    Collier County Ordinance No. 2004-05 requires that all lobbyists shall, before engaging in any lobbying activities (including, but not limited to, addressing the Board of County Commissioners, an advisory board or quasi-judicial board), register with the Clerk to the Board at the Board Minutes and Records Department.

    Anyone who requires an auxiliary aid or service for effective communication, or other reasonable accommodations to participate in this proceeding, should contact the Collier County Facilities Management Division, located at 3335 Tamiami Trail E., Suite 101, Naples, Florida 34112, or (239) 252-8380, as soon as possible, but no later than 48 hours before the scheduled event. Such reasonable accommodations will be provided at no cost to the individual.

    For more information, call Eric Johnson at (239) 252-2931.


  • 25 Mar 2019 10:39 AM | Michelle Avola (Administrator)

    HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES STAFF ANALYSIS

    BILL #: PCS for HB 107 Texting While Driving SPONSOR(S): Transportation & Infrastructure Subcommittee TIED BILLS: IDEN./SIM. BILLS:

    SUMMARY ANALYSIS The Florida Ban on Texting While Driving Law prohibits a person from texting, emailing, and instant messaging while driving for the purpose of nonvoice interpersonal communication. Enforcement is as a secondary action. This means a law enforcement officer must detain a driver for another traffic offense in order to cite the driver for texting while driving. There are certain exceptions to the prohibition. For example, the prohibition does not apply to a motor vehicle operator using a navigation device or system. In addition, the ban does not apply to a stationary motor vehicle. A first violation of the ban is a nonmoving violation and carries a $30 base fine plus court costs and fees. A second or subsequent violation committed within five years is a moving violation and carries a $60 base fine plus court costs and fees.

    The bill changes current enforcement of the ban from a secondary offense to a primary offense, which will allow a law enforcement officer to stop a vehicle solely for texting while driving. The bill does not change the existing penalties nor does it create new penalties. It also maintains the current exceptions to the texting ban and maintains that the texting ban does not apply to a stationary motor vehicle.

    The bill requires a law enforcement officer who detains a motor vehicle operator for texting while driving to inform the operator that he or she has a right to decline a search of his or her wireless communications device. Additionally, the bill prohibits a law enforcement officer from accessing the wireless communications device without a warrant, confiscating the device while waiting for the issuance of a warrant, or using coercion or other improper method to convince the operator to provide access to such device without a warrant. The bill requires consent to be unequivocal and voluntary.

    The bill also requires a law enforcement officer to record the race and ethnicity of a person issued a citation for texting while driving. The Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles (DHSMV) must annually report this information to the Governor, President of the Senate, and Speaker of the House of Representatives beginning February 1, 2020.

    To the extent there is an increase in the number of traffic citations issued because of the change to primary enforcement of the texting while driving ban, state and local governments may realize a positive fiscal impact from these additional revenues. However, the fiscal impact of this change cannot be quantified and is indeterminate. DHSMV may incur expenses associated with public awareness and education efforts about the change in enforcement of the ban on texting while driving. In addition, DHSMV may incur expenses associated with the new reporting requirements.

    Please contact the House Transportation and Infrastructure Sub-committee and ask them to support PCSHB 107 by Toledo and others.  There are several co-sponsors of the bill on the committee so make sure to thank them for their support. (Just copy and paste the list below.)

    Charlie.Stone@myfloridahouse.gov
    Rick.Roth@myfloridahouse.gov
    Tina.Polsky@myfloridahouse.gov
    Bobby.Payne@myfloridahouse.gov
    Toby.Overdorf@myfloridahouse.gov
    Stan.McClain@myfloridahouse.gov
    Adam.Hattersley@myfloridahouse.gov
    Dianne.Hart@myfloridahouse.gov
    Thad.Altman@myfloridahouse.gov
    Geraldine.Thompson@myfloridahouse.gov
    Colleen.Burton@myfloridahouse.gov
    Brad.Drake@myfloridahouse.gov

    FULL ANALYSIS

    I. SUBSTANTIVE ANALYSIS

    A. EFFECT OF PROPOSED CHANGES: Texting While Driving Studies show that texting, which simultaneously involves manual, visual, and cognitive distraction, is among the worst of all driver distractions. According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, sending or reading a text message takes a person’s eyes off the road for an average of five seconds, which at 55 mph is the equivalent of driving the length of a football field with one’s eyes closed.1

    As of April 2018, 47 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, Guam, and the U.S. Virgin Islands have passed bans on texting while driving for all drivers.2 Only three states—Arizona, Missouri, and Montana—have not passed a texting ban for all drivers.3 Two of those states—Arizona and Montana— have no ban for drivers while Missouri passed a ban on texting for drivers 21 years or younger.4 Additionally, 43 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico provide that texting while driving is subject to primary enforcement.5

    Florida’s Ban on Texting While Driving Enacted in 2013,6 s. 316.305, F.S., is the “Florida Ban on Texting While Driving Law.” The intent of the statute is to:  Improve roadway safety for all vehicle operators, vehicle passengers, bicyclists, pedestrians, and other road users.  Prevent crashes related to the act of text messaging while driving a motor vehicle.  Reduce injuries, deaths, property damage, health care costs, health insurance rates, and automobile insurance rates related to motor vehicle crashes.  Authorize law enforcement officers to stop motor vehicles and issue citations as a secondary offense to persons who are texting while driving.7

    A person may not operate a motor vehicle while manually typing or entering multiple letters, numbers, symbols, or other characters into a wireless communications device or while sending or reading data on a wireless communications device for the purpose of nonvoice interpersonal communication. Nonvoice interpersonal communication includes, but is not limited to, texting, e-mailing, and instant messaging. For purposes of the ban on texting while driving, the term “wireless communications device” means any handheld device used or capable of being used in a handheld manner, that is designed or intended to receive or transmit text or character-based messages, access or store data, or connect to the Internet or any communications service and that allows text communications.8

    1 National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, Distracted Driving, available at https://www.nhtsa.gov/risky-driving/distracted-driving (last viewed March 14, 2019). 2 National Conference of State Legislatures, Cellular Phone Use and Texting While Driving Laws, April 30, 2018, available at http://www.ncsl.org/research/transportation/cellular-phone-use-and-texting-while-driving-laws.aspx (last visited February 25, 2019). 3 Id. 4 Id. 5 Id. 6 Chapter 2013-58, L.O.F. 7 Section 316.305(2), F.S. 8 Section 316.305(3)(a), F.S.

    STORAGE NAME: pcs0107.TIS PAGE: 3 DATE: 3/22/2019

    A stationary motor vehicle is not subject to the statutory ban on texting while driving.9 In addition, the ban does not apply to a motor vehicle operator who is:  A first responder operating an emergency vehicle10 while performing his or her official duties.  Reporting an emergency, criminal activity, or suspicious activity to law enforcement authorities.  Receiving messages that are related to the operation or navigation of the motor vehicle, safetyrelated, data used primarily by the motor vehicle, or radio broadcasts.  Using a navigation device or system.  Conducting wireless interpersonal communication that does not require manual entry of information or require reading text messages, except to activate, deactivate, or initiate a feature or function.  Operating an autonomous vehicle11 in autonomous mode.12

    Only in the event of a crash resulting in death or personal injury may a user’s billing records for a wireless communications device or the testimony of or written statements from appropriate authorities receiving such messages be admissible as evidence in any proceeding to determine whether the offense of texting while driving has been committed.13

    A first violation of the ban on texting while driving is a nonmoving violation and carries a $30 fine plus court costs,14 which could result in a total fine up to $108.15 A second or subsequent violation of the ban committed within five years after the date of a prior conviction is a moving violation with three points added to the driver license record and carries a $60 fine plus court costs,16 which could result in a total fine up to $158.17 In addition to these penalties, any violation of the ban that causes a crash results in six points added to the offender’s driver license record.18 Any violation of the ban committed in conjunction with any moving violation for which points are assessed, when committed within a school safety zone, results in an additional two points added to the offender’s driver license record.19

    As previously noted, enforcement of the ban on texting while driving by state or local law enforcement agencies is as a secondary action only. A motor vehicle operator must be detained for a suspected violation of another traffic violation in order to be cited for texting while driving.20

    9 Id. 10 Section 322.01(4), F.S., defines “authorized emergency vehicle” as a vehicle that is equipped with extraordinary audible and visual warning devices, that is authorized to display red or blue lights, and that is on call to respond to emergencies. The term includes, but is not limited to, ambulances, law enforcement vehicles, fire trucks, and other rescue vehicles. It does not include wreckers, utility trucks, or other vehicles that are used only incidentally for emergency purposes. 11 Section 316.003(2), F.S., defines “autonomous vehicle” as any vehicle equipped with autonomous technology. 12 Section 316.305(3)(b), F.S. 13 Section 316.305(3)(c), F.S. 14 Section 316.305(4)(a), F.S.; see also Ch. 318, F.S. 15 Florida Court Clerks and Comptrollers, 2018 Distribution Schedule of Court-Related Filing Fees, Service Charges, Costs and Fines, p. 19, available at: https://cdn.ymaws.com/www.flclerks.com/resource/resmgr/public_documents_/2018_distribution_schedule_1.pdf (last visited January 16, 2019). 16 Section 316.305(4)(b), F.S.; see also Ch. 318, F.S., and s. 322.27(3)(d)7., F.S. 17 Florida Court Clerks and Comptrollers, supra at 15, p. 21. 18 Section 322.27(3)(d)3., F.S. 19 Section 322.27(3)(d)11., F.S. 20 Section 316.305(5), F.S. 21 Email from Kevin Jacobs, Deputy Legislative Affairs Director, Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles, RE: HB 107, (January 17, 2019).

    Law Enforcement Access to Cell Phones

    Court Decisions In 2013, the Florida Supreme Court found that while it is proper to separate a suspect from his or her cell phone incident to an arrest, a warrant is required before the information, data, and contents of the cell phone can be accessed by law enforcement.22 In 2014, the United States Supreme Court unanimously held that, in general, law enforcement is not permitted to search a person’s cell phone incident to an arrest without a warrant and that the search of a cell phone implicates privacy concerns far beyond those implicated by searching other objects.23

    Florida Law Section 316.646, F.S., authorizes digital proof of automobile insurance. The statute provides that the act of presenting to a law enforcement officer an electronic device displaying proof of insurance in an electronic format does not constitute consent for the officer to access any other information on the device other than the displayed proof of insurance.

    Effect of Proposed Changes

    The bill amends the Florida Ban on Texting While Driving Law to change the current enforcement of the ban on texting while driving from secondary to primary. This change will allow a law enforcement officer to detain a motor vehicle operator solely for texting while driving.

    The bill requires a law enforcement officer who detains a motor vehicle operator for a violation of the ban on texting while driving to inform the motor vehicle operator of his or her right to decline a search of his or her wireless communications device. The bill prohibits a law enforcement officer from:  Accessing the wireless communications device without a warrant.  Confiscating the wireless communications device while awaiting issuance of a warrant to access such device.  Obtaining consent from the motor vehicle operator to search his or her wireless communications device through coercion or other improper method. Consent to search a motor vehicle operator’s wireless communications device must be voluntary and unequivocal.

    The bill provides that when a law enforcement officer issues a citation for texting while driving, the officer must record the race and ethnicity of the violator. All law enforcement agencies must maintain the information and report it to DHSMV in a DHSMV-specified form and manner. Beginning February 1, 2020, DHSMV must annually report the data collected to the Governor, President of the Senate, and Speaker of the House of Representatives. The data collected must be reported at least by statewide totals for local law enforcement agencies, state law enforcement agencies, and state university law enforcement agencies. The statewide total for local law enforcement agencies must combine the data for the county sheriffs and the municipal law enforcement agencies. 22 Smallwood v. State of Florida, 113 So. 3d 724 (Fla. 2013). 23 Riley v. California, 134 U.S. 2473 (2014).

    STORAGE NAME: pcs0107.TIS PAGE: 5 DATE: 3/22/2019

    The bill maintains the current penalties for a violation of the Florida Ban on Texting While Driving Law. In addition, the bill maintains the current exceptions to the texting ban. For example, the ban will continue to allow the use of a navigation device or system. Finally, the bill maintains that the texting ban does not apply to a stationary motor vehicle.

    B. SECTION DIRECTORY: Section 1: Amends s. 316.305, F.S., relating to the prohibition of using wireless communications devices while driving.

    Section 2: Provides an effective date of July 1, 2019.


  • 27 Oct 2017 11:30 PM | Anonymous

    Longtime NPC sponsor Mark Wilson, owner of London Bay Homes, was named to the Junior Achievement of Southwest Florida Business Hall of Fame. 

    read more

  • 19 Oct 2017 11:30 PM | Anonymous

    NPC appealed to Collier County's state legislators to help push through legislation to make texting while Driving a primary offense.  Watch the presentation. Go to 2:24:50 on the video.

    watch the presentation

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